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8 – 11 MAY 2022 VIRTUAL

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20th International Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Viruses

VIRTUAL: Sunday 8 – Wednesday 11 May 2022

The 2022 International Virtual Conference on Human Retrovirology: HTLV and Related Viruses aims to focus on Oceania and especially Australia for the first time in the history of this conference. In 2022 we aim to emphasise the need to increase HTLV-1 public health and social science research output in the global response to HTLV-1.

This new emphasis is a direct response to the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) recent global consultation on HTLV-1 that called for global initiatives to reduce the HTLV-1 burden.

The HTLV 2022 conference is hosted virtually by Melbourne, Australia on behalf of IRVA, The International Retrovirology Association and will be in Australian Eastern Standard Time. We hope to announce a face to face Melbourne hub for those able to travel pending the evolving COVID-19 pandemic in Australia.

History of the Conference

The conference was initiated by IRVA, The International Retrovirology Association to promote research and education in the field of human retrovirology at an international level. The Association has chosen to focus on HTLV and other related human and nonhuman primate retroviruses, in part, because numerous other organizations and conferences already exist to study human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

The Association strives to promote excellent science in the field of HTLV and related viruses and to facilitate the communication of scientific results. The Association fosters the education and training of young scientists who will contribute to and expand the field. The Association promotes bench-to-bedside research that translates findings from the laboratory into clinical trials that benefit HTLV-infected patients. In addition, the Association promotes awareness of and education about HTLV and related viruses to non-specialist physicians and the broader public.